Using Eye Colour is All About Good Combos

Since the first successful colour process was created by the Lumière brothers in 1907, everything has slowly come to colour; television, cars, monitors, phone screens, and now, every single new eyeshadow palette release. So, if it’s so popular, why are people so apprehensive to wear colourful eye makeup? In a world where Morphe sell 42 pan palettes of rainbow hues at suspiciously good prices, I don’t think we can afford to not be colourful.

But, I get it. I do. Colour is intimidating. Pink-eye is a look closer associated with, ahem, health complications and yellow-eye just sounds hideous. Colourful eye makeup is historically reserved for the runway and, in more recent years, seems to be something that exists predominantly in YouTube tutorials and Instagram grids. That said, I am partial to a full glam grocery run when I’m too lazy to take off a look I’ve just spent hours creating in my room. 

The issue with using eye colour is that it’s hard to know what colours work well together until you’ve made enough mistakes to learn what colours don’t work well together. And it’s not just what makeup tones suit each other, but also what eye combos suit what clothes, lipstick and hairstyle. Choose the wrong selection of colours and it’ll date you no end. You’ll feel mortified whenever you think about the fact you thought red and green was a good idea at Christmas. Hi, Mr Grinch.

The good news is that there is a simple way to knowing what colours go together for eye  makeup. And it’s by keeping your selection to one palette. Each palette is crafted by experts – they all have skin in the colour game – who wouldn’t put two colours on a palette that couldn’t work together somehow. Obviously, I’m not talking The James Charles Artistry Palette. Only he knows how to make a red and blue combo work. Think more Natasha Denona and Anastasia Beverly Hills.

Start small, too. A 6 pan palette with colours that go together on paper – or palette – will definitely go together on your eyelids. I love the Huda Beauty Obsessions range. And once the palette is chosen, go for a look that you know you can master (sorry, cut crease!) and get blending. And I mean blending that meticulous, refined brush type of blending. My humble experience has shown me that half of the battle of making bright colours go together is making them blend seamlessly.

And if after all of this you’re irrevocably itching to use opposing colours, keep one for your top lid and the other for your bottom lid. A simple underlining of blue with most colours is a sure winner. 

Happy colour co-ordinating!

 

This is the Real Reason you Should be Wetting your Beauty Blender

We’ve all been there: sat down ready to do our makeup and realising one very important thing is missing… a freshly-wet beauty blenderCommence the angry trudge to the sink to wet, squeeze and repeat. 

But despite how often this happens – in my case, a little more than I’m proud of – do we know why we’re supposed to wet our beauty blenders? Like, really know why? It turns out, apparently not. 

I’ve always thought you should wet your beauty blender because when damp and spongey, it reaches your face’s little nooks and crannies, as well as helps different products blend together. And while this may hold some truth – after all, spongey = flexible – there is a more technical reason you should wet your beauty blender.

And that is because the water stops the beauty blender from absorbing product.

“The reason beautyblender works best when wet is because water helps it reach its absorption capacity,” says beautyblender founder, Rea Ann Silvan. “- so it won’t absorb your makeup!”

To prove this, beautyblender advises cutting an old sponge in half when wet. The result? Well, 2 halves of a whole beauty blender, and an open core that shows no product on the inside – just pure colour.

But that’s not all wetting your trusty sponges is good for. According to Silva, a wet blender means “your makeup [will] bounce on beautifully with no lines or brush stroke marks.”

So, while I’m not a total eejit for thinking wetting my beauty blender was a concept developed to aid contouring, it’s good to know there’s a technical logic behind the urban beauty legend.

It’s just a shame they don’t come pre-wet like this cool little guy…

Images sourced from @beautyblender Instagram.

The Importance of Understanding Cosmetic Ingredients

If you flew across the world today and you’re a beauty guru or enthusiast, you’d probably pop into Sephora. With Kat Von D, Huda Beauty, Fenty Beauty, Cover FX, It Cosmetics, Zoeva, YSL, Hourglass, Sephora Collection and so much more (!!) all in the flesh, it’s a beauty emporium of glitz and goth, and everything in between. Sure, Debenhams is great and Selfridges’ choice of luxury beauty is a treat upon every trip into London, but UK beauty lovers can all agree: Sephora is where it’s at.

And, when you combine this selection of brands with wide-eyed, eager-to-beautify staff furnished in black branded tops and intense glitter cut creases floating around as if this is their perfectly polished living room and you’re the first guest they’ve had in years, it’s hard not to get swept up in the Sephora experience.

But, while the beauties at work celebrate the makeup that pushes boundaries, innovates and entrances, and encourage you to do so too with every ‘babe’, ‘hun’ and ‘gorgeous’, they are masking a darker reality. That is, maybe sometimes a Sephora product might be shit… and might give you a violent rash that looks like cracked red nail polish smudged across your eyelids. Yes, that happened to me.

I purchased the Sephora Collection Extra-Gentle Bi-Phase Makeup Remover For Eyes & Lips with such optimism. I believed it may be Lancôme Bi-Facil Eye Makeup Remover dupe I dreamed of. Alas, I was wrong.

My insensitive skin took a battering. Confused and concerned, I did some research.

This ‘extra-gentle’ formula contains 1,2-hexanediol. 1,2-hexanediol is a humectant and coupling agent composed of seemingly harmless chemicals, like anti-inflammatory compounds. But it has been criticised and challenged because it is known to irritate skin and even cause dermatitis – especially around the eyes.

Let me iterate, my issue is not with Sephora but rather with myself. I didn’t do my homework. Like many beauty-interested individuals, I believe what I am told and pursue what I assume. Which is largely okay, but I must say, a silly choice where your eyes are concerned.

It is okay to believe a bronzer is ashy and test it to find it oxidises orange. It is okay to believe a set of lashes are wispy to wear them and discover the opposite. But I jeopardised a very delicate area of skin, around a very vital organ.

After learning about 1,2-hexanediol, I raided my bathroom shelf to discover that it is not in any of my other make-up removers or gel cleansers. Perhaps if I was aware of the chemicals I already use and don’t react to, and researched the new ones I was investing in, I would have avoided a scaly, inflamed rash and days of painful blinking.

But I only have myself to blame. The lesson learnt from this is that I should be more vigilant about what I am putting onto delicate and raw skin. Rather than considering the consequences of new eye-skincare without checking the ingredients, I chose to join the cut-crease babes in dancing around their perfectly polished counters like I was the first guest they’ve had in years.

The Sephora experience gobbled me up and spat my eyes out, but I have learnt my lesson.