Using Eye Colour is All About Good Combos

Since the first successful colour process was created by the Lumière brothers in 1907, everything has slowly come to colour; television, cars, monitors, phone screens, and now, every single new eyeshadow palette release. So, if it’s so popular, why are people so apprehensive to wear colourful eye makeup? In a world where Morphe sell 42 pan palettes of rainbow hues at suspiciously good prices, I don’t think we can afford to not be colourful.

But, I get it. I do. Colour is intimidating. Pink-eye is a look closer associated with, ahem, health complications and yellow-eye just sounds hideous. Colourful eye makeup is historically reserved for the runway and, in more recent years, seems to be something that exists predominantly in YouTube tutorials and Instagram grids. That said, I am partial to a full glam grocery run when I’m too lazy to take off a look I’ve just spent hours creating in my room. 

The issue with using eye colour is that it’s hard to know what colours work well together until you’ve made enough mistakes to learn what colours don’t work well together. And it’s not just what makeup tones suit each other, but also what eye combos suit what clothes, lipstick and hairstyle. Choose the wrong selection of colours and it’ll date you no end. You’ll feel mortified whenever you think about the fact you thought red and green was a good idea at Christmas. Hi, Mr Grinch.

The good news is that there is a simple way to knowing what colours go together for eye  makeup. And it’s by keeping your selection to one palette. Each palette is crafted by experts – they all have skin in the colour game – who wouldn’t put two colours on a palette that couldn’t work together somehow. Obviously, I’m not talking The James Charles Artistry Palette. Only he knows how to make a red and blue combo work. Think more Natasha Denona and Anastasia Beverly Hills.

Start small, too. A 6 pan palette with colours that go together on paper – or palette – will definitely go together on your eyelids. I love the Huda Beauty Obsessions range. And once the palette is chosen, go for a look that you know you can master (sorry, cut crease!) and get blending. And I mean blending that meticulous, refined brush type of blending. My humble experience has shown me that half of the battle of making bright colours go together is making them blend seamlessly.

And if after all of this you’re irrevocably itching to use opposing colours, keep one for your top lid and the other for your bottom lid. A simple underlining of blue with most colours is a sure winner. 

Happy colour co-ordinating!

 

What ‘Burnt’ Means To Beauty

In the real world, the term ‘burnt’ implies scorched. We think of a hazy-morning toast mishap or blocks of wood crumbling to ash. Yet, these ideas have not transpired into the beauty world.

In the beauty world, ‘burnt’ means deep oranges and tangy browns. And the beauty of this trend lies with two things: its versatility and its similarity to the classic smoky eye.

Versatility

The ever-annoying rules of this-suits-this-eye-colour or this-suits-this-skin-tone don’t apply to burnt eye-shadow. All you need is some fluffy brushes and eye-lids concealed a few shades lighter than your skin tone.

You can dip your toe into the trend with a light dusting of a muted orange in your crease. But you can also kick start a journey of mastery by creating a skilfully-blended medley of muted oranges, tangy browns, exuberant oranges and dark browns. The beauty of burnt is that it grants opportunities alike of soft-glam or GLAM-glam.

Imitating The Ever-Classic Smoky Eye

A burnt eye is often created in the likeness of the classic smoky-eye… without the tonal severity. Many of its looks start light with a muted-orange base before adding darker colours to the crease and outer-corner to build intensity. And what makes it so close to the smoky eye is how often its wearers extend the shadow onto the lower lash line for ultimate heat.

And just like the smoky eye, you must decide what you want the look to demand. Is it intricate analysis from observers or a deep eyelid crease for the illusion of larger eyes?

However, achieving the perfect level of burnt with orange and tangy shades anxiously toes the line with festival-esque eye-shadow. So, for this trend, choosing the right palette is more important than ever. Think Urban Decay’s Naked Heat, Juvia’s Place’s The Saharan palettes or Beauty Bay’s Saffron Barker collection.Processed with VSCO with dog1 presetOr think Violet Voss’s Hashtag Palette – my unwavering go-to for the burnt eye. And in true imitation of the smoky eye, I used the BH Cosmetics Smokey Eye Essentials brush collection to create this look.Processed with VSCO with c1 presetI started with dusting ‘Sauce’ all over the lid with No.1, a large blending brush. This brown created a smooth base for me to go over with the same brush in the shade ‘Savage’ to create a tangy but neutral base.

I then dusted ‘Goals’ in the crease with No.2, a small tapered brush, and blended it out in circular motions. And for intensity, the more precise No.3 brush allowed me to carve out my crease with ‘G.O.A.T’ and then the outer-corner with brush No.5, BH Cosmetics’s best smudging brush.

For intensity, repeat the process. And to finish, I put on Tiggy Lashes in the style ‘Natalie.’ I personally don’t wear eyeliner with burnt looks because I like the colours to speak for themselves.Processed with VSCO with dog1 presetIf the smoky eye is your thing and you’re looking to broaden your colour choice, turn to burnt. It’s time that, amidst neutrality captivating the beauty world’s focus, burnt overtakes smoky.

And for tips on how to achieve the perfect burnt eye look through brush mastery, be sure to read my guide on the essentials to eye-shadow blending here. Have a fab NYE!

Not Your Average St. Patrick’s Day Eye-Shadow Inspo

In the name of St Patrick’s Day, the beauty world is going to churn out a magnitude of bright green looks this weekend. But green can be a tough one – vibrant or soft? Glitter or matte? One shade or multi-colour cut crease?

It feels like a time where not bleeding green makes you the Irish Grinch without the green body… A major paradox. But green isn’t the only route to take this St Patrick’s Day and you can just as easily seek inspiration from more elegant Irish traditions.

Focusing too closely on Instagram looks and trying to abide by that culture, rather than the celebration, isn’t what this weekend’s makeup should be about. Delve deeper than mainstream culture and look for truly Irish inspiration that you can add a personal touch to.  

Here are some looks I’m going to be channelling over this weekend…

End-of-the-rainbow pot of gold

Folkloric bronze

Celtic embellishment

Ireland isn’t called the Green Isle, it’s our very own Emerald Isle. A name so classy calls for more than bright green clichés. It calls for golds and bronzes and deep emerald greens.

Have a great St. Patrick’s Day,
Josie Marie xo

If It Isn’t Blue, It Isn’t True

Blue is the latest statement colour on lids across cyberspace and the world… If it isn’t blue, it isn’t true.

A new wave of block-blue eyeshadow has woven itself into recent fashion weeks and Instagram culture. Kourtney Kardashian has done it, I’ve done it (lol), and a magnitude of artists were doing it. Blue isn’t black so it isn’t harsh, but a touch of navy can add impressive depth to one’s eyeshadow.

Even in its lighter forms, pastel forms and intense shimmer forms, blue lends that extra classy bit of colour to an eye look. Luckily, the tonal range and versatility of blue suits all eye colours. Kourtney Kardashian’s Instagram post from Japan with a block-blue look created by celebrity make-up artist Mario Dedivanovic (@MakeupByMario) had me feeling some type of way. 

So what?

It isn’t just the Kardashian’s that Mario has been creating this look for. I did some research and found similar block looks littered through his Instagram. I was defo feeling some type of way.

A few months ago, Mario did a demo session with Revlon and created one of the most outstanding blue eyeshadow looks Instagram holds. It was a block-blue lid on model Sarah Simmons, blended into a base of turquoise, with purple shadow lining her bottom water line.

Naturally, I had to recreate it.

This style of look may feel scary because of the intensity of colour, or perhaps your fear rests on the importance of blending, but it is relatively easy to recreate. I went straight in with Urban Decay Full Spectrum and covered my lid and crease with vibrant blue shade ‘Blindsided.’ Base down – I moved on to duller (but by no means lesser) blue ‘Metamorphoses’ and covered my lid.

Face make-up done, I went in with a mix of the purple ‘Sketch’ and the pink ‘Gossip’ to line my water eye. Voila! A finished look served by Josie Marie.

So, actually now what?

Ultimately, blue does scare people, there’s no two ways about it. Blue eyeshadow when you’re not even sure if you can contour yet? I must be joking!

Truth is, nobody really gets it right. I messed up my recreation, but that doesn’t discredit the effort and the skill it takes to blend or the confidence to start stepping out of your comfort zone. Lucky for me, colour is my comfort zone. And it’s cool if it isn’t yours, but confidence is cool regardless, so if that means covering your lid in one tone of blue or three, it will work if you let it.

Josie Marie xo